Evidence-Informed Decision-Making

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Last Update

  • Updated.jpg 17 June 2017

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Introduction

See also Blogs | Evaluating health information | Evidence-based medicine | Medical education portal | Point-of-care tools in medicine | Systematic review searching

"Evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM) is ‘the process of distilling and disseminating the best available evidence from research, practice and experience and using that evidence to inform and improve public health policy and practice. Put simply, it means finding, using and sharing what works in public health." (National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools)

Overview

  • Evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM) is "...a continuous interactive process involving the explicit, conscientious and judicious consideration of the best available evidence to provide care. It is essential to optimize outcomes for individual clients, promote healthy communities and populations, improve clinical practice, achieve cost-effective nursing care and ensure accountability and transparency in decision-making within the health-care system." NursesOne
  • According to the OAPN Canadian Centre of Excellence (2010, p. 1), evidence-informed decision-making is the "...purposeful and systematic use of the best available evidence to inform the assessment of various options and related decision making in practice, program development, and policy making."
  • In its position statement on evidence-informed decision-making and nursing practice, the Canadian Nurses Association defines evidence-informed decision-making as "...a continuous interactive process involving the explicit, conscientious and judicious consideration of the best available evidence to provide care"' (Canadian Nurses Association [CNA], 2010, p. 1).
  • Evidence-based medicine has been criticized in large part due to myth that the only acceptable evidence is from randomized controlled trials or meta-analyses. Donald Berwick, a Harvard-based quality-improvement expert, declared in 2008 that employing evidence-based medicine methods must sometimes take a back seat to patient-centered care (Rahman & Applebaum, 2010). Evidence-based medicine has also been criticized for ignoring a clinician’s instincts and experience. As a result, the term evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM) began to be used “to attempt to get beyond some resistance to evidence-based practice, and to acknowledge that other types of evidence are useful and important in making decisions.” (NCCMT, 2010, para. 4)

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